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Membership in the NASSHP is open to all clinicians and scientists who have an interest in the study of hypertensive complications of pregnancy and its related fields.
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News and information about NASSHP, directly from the Society's 2014-2016 President, Eugene Chang, MD.
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President's Page

Direct from the Society's 2012-2014 President, Doug Woelkers, MD...news and information about NASSHP.

2013 Scientific Meeting Location Secured!

This year's Annual Scientific Meeting will be held Friday, September 13 through Sunday, September 15, 2013 at the exclusive and historical landmark, Le Place D’Armes Hotel & Suites in Montreal, Québec, Canada. The meeting is jointly sponsored by both the North American Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy (NASSHP) and the Groupe d’Étude en Médecine Obstétricale du Québec (GÉMOQ).

The 2013 Annual Scientific Meeting will be filled with robust plenary discussions, several detailed research study sessions, and also includes the awarding of six (6) competitive travel awards of $400 each to Young Investigators with submission of oral presentation and documentation of trainee status. Final abstracts have been accepted and award recipients have been notified.

Tentative meeting schedule:

To take advantage of the special hotel room block pricing available for this meeting, hotel reservations with Le Place D’Armes Hotel & Suites (888.450.1887) must be made before August 13, 2013.

Join us in Montreal this September!



Successful 2012 Society Meeting of the NASSHP

  The 2012 society meeting for the NASSHP was held September 7-9th, 2012 at Kiawah Island just south of Charleston, South Carolina. The meeting was an excellent venue for junior and more experienced investigators alike, and the location was superb. Issuing three Young Investigator Awards at this year's meeting, the NASSHP again demonstrated how very supportive they are of junior investigators involved in preeclampsia research. This meeting continued the tradition of sponsoring a smaller meeting in order to allow expert presentations and small group seminars to take place in an informal setting. Communication and collaboration between junior investigators and more experienced investigators was fostered.

  The meeting was an excellent venue for junior and more experienced investigators alike, and the location was superb. Issuing three Young Investigator Awards at this year's meeting, the NASSHP again demonstrated how very supportive they are of junior investigators involved in preeclampsia research. This meeting continued the tradition of sponsoring a smaller meeting in order to allow expert presentations and small group seminars to take place in an informal setting. Communication and collaboration between junior investigators and more experienced investigators was fostered.

Speakers present and topics covered during our 2012 meeting were:

Rob Powers.  “Framing the Question”

Scott Walsh.  “Neutrophils: Critical Mediators of Vascular Dysfunction in Preeclampsia”

Kyu-Ho Lee.  “Congenital Outflow Tract Abnormalities and Their Link to Preeclampsia”

Sarosh Rana.  “Angiogenic factors and Preeclampsia Evaluation in Triage”

Don Job.  "Computer-based tools for evaluating risk"

Surendra Sharma.  “A ‘humanized’ Mouse Model and Novel Approaches for Preeclampsia”

Liliya M. Yamaleyeva.  “ACE2 Deficiency Enhances Angiotensin II-Induced Vasoconstriction of the Uterine Artery at Mid- Gestation in Mice”

Sajid Shahul. "Subclinical Left Ventricular Dysfunction in Preeclamptic Women with Preserved  Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction: A 2D Speckle Tracking Imaging Study”

Eleni Tsigas.  “Preeclampsia Registry and BioBank: Investing Now”

Ellen Seely.  "Increased Angiotensin II Sensitivity Predisposes Women with Prior Preeclampsia to Future Cardiovascular Disease"

Richard M. Burwick.  “Elevated Urinary C5a Levels in Severe Preeclampsia / HELLP Syndrome Are Not Associated with Clinical Measures of Renal Impairment”

Deepa Shah.  “Acute Pulmonary Edema Is More Common In Women With Eclampsia If Initial Care Is Rendered At A Small Rural Hospital Compared To A Tertiary Care Center”

Marshall Lindheimer. “The History Of Preeclampsia As Seen By A Nephrologist”

~Stay tuned for NASSHP's 2013 Society Meeting information to be announced soon!~

 

New NASSHP Logo Design

In the transition of the NASSHP administrative offices to the Preeclampsia Foundation and the design of the new NASSHP website discussions began regarding the NASSHP logo and the designing of a new logo. It was felt that the old logo was no longer relevant and that this was a good time for a redesign. Several new designs were circulated internally, and a final design has been accepted. It was felt that the new logo should convey the identity and purpose of our organization, and several key aspects are central, including: pregnancy, the woman, the fetus, the cardiovascular nature of the disease, the placenta, and research.

Many thanks to Eleni Tsigas, Executive Director of Preeclampsia Foundation, as well as Janin Cliff Design, for supporting our efforts and assisting us in creating a new, revitalized logo.

 

Preeclampsia Foundation Announces Research Funding Opportunity

Preeclampsia Foundation’s research investment catalyzes new approaches to age-old life-threatening complication of pregnancy

Dallas, Texas – February 9, 2012 – The Preeclampsia Foundation announced today from The Pregnancy Meeting™ in Dallas that new funding is available for preeclampsia research and applications are now being accepted for its 2012 Vision Grant program. Up to two medical research grants will be awarded, up to $25,000 each. Vision Grants are intended to provide initial funding for innovative ideas focused on the pathophysiology, diagnosis or treatment of preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome and other hypertensive disorders of pregnancy that might otherwise not be pursued due to lack of funding. All novel, well-considered research topics are encouraged. International applicants will be accepted, but applications must be in English.

The application deadline is May 18, 2012, with awards announced August 17, 2012.  More information and application instructions can be found at http://www.preeclampsia.org/research/research-funding.

Since its inception, the Foundation’s Vision Grant program has invested $450,000, including this newly announced funding, in novel research ranging from molecular biology and immunology, to potential therapies, to the relationship of sleep-disordered breathing to preeclampsia.

Each year, dozens of applications are received from around the world, from as far as India and Australia to nearby Canada and the United States. Research initiated by the Vision Grant program has resulted in promising findings, warranting additional funding from the National Institutes of Health, presentations at scientific conferences, and inspiring young investigators to commit their efforts to a medical conundrum that has baffled the medical community for over 2,000 years.

“I’m impressed by the breadth and quality of applications we receive,” remarked Dr. Thomas Easterling, director of the Preeclampsia Foundation’s Medical Advisory Board. “It just goes to show how important this issue is and how scarce traditional sources of research funding are.”

About the Vision Grant Award Program: According to the World Health Organization, preeclampsia is one of the least funded areas of research, especially when considered against Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). The Preeclampsia Foundation’s Vision Grants fund medical research pertaining to the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

About Preeclampsia: Preeclampsia is a disorder that occurs during pregnancy and the immediate postpartum period, and affects both the mother and the fetus. It is a rapidly progressive condition characterized by elevated blood pressure and protein in the urine; other symptoms may include swelling in the hands and face, headaches, and visual disturbances. Preeclampsia affects the mother's kidneys, liver and other vital organs and, if undetected or untreated, can lead to seizures (eclampsia), cerebral hemorrhage, failure in vital organs and death. The cause of preeclampsia is still not fully understood, and the only cure for the condition begins with delivery. Approximately five to eight percent of pregnancies are affected by preeclampsia, which, in the United States, translates to approximately 300,000 pregnancies. It is a leading cause of preterm birth, and is responsible for approximately 76,000 maternal deaths and half a million infant deaths worldwide annually. There are several types of preeclampsia, including HELLP syndrome, a particularly dangerous variant.

About the Preeclampsia Foundation: The Preeclampsia Foundation is a U.S.-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization established in 2000. It is dedicated to providing patient support and education, raising public awareness, catalyzing research and improving health care practices, envisioning a world where preeclampsia and related hypertensive disorders of pregnancy no longer threaten the lives of mothers and babies. For more information, visit www.preeclampsia.org.